Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Eat This Poem: A Literary Feast of Recipes Inspired by Poetry, by Nicole Gulotta

sometimes feelings are delicious.

Eat This Poem: A Literary Feast of Recipes Inspired by PoetryIt's not often that you read a blueberry pancake recipe with teary eyes from a moving poem about loss. (Unless you read the Eat this Poem blog, in which case I suppose that's in the realm of normality.)

The combination of poems, stories, and recipes is a creative and novel twist to the traditional cookbook, adding feeling to the recipes and grounding the poetry in everyday practicality.

The whole endeavor feels delightfully classy, like you're walking around an art gallery sipping wine you can't pronounce -- but the recipes are often comforting recipes that are appropriate for beginners and chefs alike. (I am especially looking forward to testing out the mushroom and brie quesadillas.)

This would go well an any cookbook collection, and would make a fun conversation piece as a coffee table book.

I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Amazing Crafty Cat by Charise Mericle Harper

Birdie the cat girl is pretty entertaining.

The Amazing Crafty Cat (Crafty Cat, #1)A little human girl, Birdie, secretly mentally transforms into Crafty Cat when she needs to call upon her artistic powers. This cute graphic novel/stream of consciousness adventure will inspire children to creatively tackle everyday problems.

It is a relatively quick read, with large pictures and small text. Craft instructions are provided in the back of the book. While it would have been nice to see a real photograph of what the finished product should be, as opposed to just cartoon illustrations, it may pressure kids less to make theirs look exactly "right."

I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Happiness Doesn't Come from Headstands by Tamara Levitt

It's okay -- I can't exactly do one, either.

Happiness Doesn't Come from Headstands


Leela can do a lot of things... but headstands are not one of them. Despite persistent practice, the perfect headstand eludes her. However, with the support of her friend, Leela chooses to celebrate her other abilities rather than wallow in disappointment. This charming and aesthetically-pleasing story encourages optimism and self-soothing and models compassionate friendship. Recommended for read-aloud to pre-reader groups.

I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Sunday, March 5, 2017

The Way Home in the Night by Akiko Miyakoshi

It's actually quite inviting, for a dark city street.


The Way Home in the Night A thoughtful book that will encourage young children to consider the shared humanity of the strangers they see from day to day.

The illustrations are a bit dark, but that's to expected from a story that takes place exclusively at night.

Recommended for reading to older pre-readers and early readers at bedtime, when children can imagine the unique lives of all the people they met that day.

I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Saturday, March 4, 2017

A Horse Named Steve by Kelly Collier

Steve is my spirit animal.

A Horse Named Steve Steve the horse decides to wear a golden horn on his head in an attempt to stand out. However, when all the other animals in the forest start wearing things on their head, he bucks the trend and stands out with his natural no-horn look.

A cute book with fun, quirky illustrations, this tells a much needed story about how you can be exceptional if you're just like everyone else, or if you're the different one.


I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Last Tree by Ingrid Chabbert

Stunning artwork. and a wonderful premise; but I'm just not feeling very enthusiastic.

The Last Tree In a world where there are no more trees or grass, two little boys discover a little sapling. When they find out that some land developers are doing to bulldoze it to make a new building, they dig it up and replant it somewhere else. They revisit it a few years later, and the sapling has grown into a tree. The end.

The book is beautifully illustrated, but it is very dark and pessimistic for a storybook aimed at the younger age bracket. I wouldn't read it aloud to any kids I know.

I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Friday, March 3, 2017

Stop Feedin' da Boids! by James Sage

*shrug*

Stop Feedin' da Boids! The story was a little confusing, and I can only assume that maybe a page or two was missing from my digital ARC. I'm not really sure how it resolves itself.

The tone of the illustrations was a little too dark, and I wasn't a fan of the way the people were drawn.

Overall, it didn't really do it for me.

I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.